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-wage china when he was on the board of gateway computer. he wants to turn michigan into the same low wage environment we see in china. >> reporter: looking around here live at the scene at the capitol, you have teachers who took the day off from school to demonstrate. you have united auto workers. we saw several big trucks from the teamsters. a lot of people sympathetic to efforts of these workers out here making their voices heard, expressing their discontent with what has happened. governor snyder told me a short time ago this is in response to a ballot initiative you remember failed in november. that was proposition 2. it would have put collective bargaining in the michigan constitution. it would have made it untouchable by any kind of new legislation. that is part of the complaint from the democrats. they say it is politics and retribution. also the complaint you hear from democrats it happened so fast. it happened without the public having time for input. what you see on the lawn is something governor snyder referenced f there wasn't enough time for public input you wouldn't have all
dollar funded battery marker a-123 systems is up for sale. the winning bid goes to -- china. so i asked was red china rising why u.s. taxpayers have to finance their battery companies. here's ann lee, author of "what the u.s. can learn from china," professor of nyu and visiting professor from beijing university and author kwof "death by china" and cnbc contributor. ann, let me go to you first. if we, the u.s. taxpayer and government are dumb enough to build a goofy battery company that goes bankrupt why shouldn't china scoop it up? >> i think this is a great story. first of all, taxpayer money wasn't wasted. all that money from the government went to help property plant and equipment here on american soil. and it's staying in america. chinese companies are not going to pack it up and move it to china. it's staying in the united states. they are going to hire u.s. employees to run it. that means more american prosperity. that's what we want. i think this is a win-win situation. the company that bought this is basically like the warren buffett of china. >> all right. let me get there. the
is leading the charge. i have met with what i think will be the next president of china. we have delegations from china to come here. we're sending delegations there. this is not just business as usual. we're getting detailed committees and proposals, a couple of the key states. we want good coming this way. we want good going out way. -- goods coming this way and we want goods going out that way. >> are you doing anything like that? >> we have been working on the north-south access. we have a biannual that denver works on that brings people together for cultural, business, intellectual exchange and focuses on mexico and chile and brazil. one of the great things we're missing right now, it is part of the root of this mess about it -- immigration. our partners are right there. those old movies where people -- there was the girl next door, and the hero tries to fall in love with some likely candidates. she turns out to be loyal and ticks down her hair and -- takes down her hair and glasses. that is mexico. brazil and you'll get all those countries, we have to go look at china. we have to reach
's turn to the global economy. associated press reporting that china has surpassed the u.s. as the leading trade partner. this comes as china announces the inflation rate rose 2% one month alone. sign of an economy gaining strength. what does it mean? brenda buttner, anchor of "bulls and bears." i was reading this article where shoppers in beijing have seen the prices of vegetables double in one week alone. inflation is a problem over there. what is causing it? >> basically it's not a bad problem, it's growth. china has numbers we can only dream of, growth of about 8%, we're below 2%. their factory output was up 10%. retail sales, 15%. so it is basically growth driven not supply side driven which is the kind of inflation you want to see. it's only 2%, that is well below the target of 4% is. it came down from 6.7%. >> gregg: so it's an issue not really a problem and outweighed by the huge growth. how does the inflation american consumers if at all? >> we buy a lot from china. it may be that some of the input may be more expensive. we may have to pay more, but it's more that china is becomin
think the world will look like. it's fascinating. it shows china on the rise, the west in decline and china overtaking the united states in size of economy by the year 2030. here are the key findings of the new intel report. it's interesting reading. a majority of the world's population by 2030 will be out of poverty for the first time in world history. there will be wars over food and water and natural resores. populations will continue to rise and there will be recurring global economic crises but when you think about this, you think about how far we're going here. you've got asia, china in particular will be dominant. it will be stronger than its been anytime since middleages. there will be no more pax americana as its known. china will be a big driver and india will be growing like china is today. they talk about how the world is changing. it's like no other time since the french revolution. remember in the late 18th century, the industrial revolution, except it's happening more quickly. it's taking a tenth of the time for china and asia to rise quickly. let me read to you som
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
other. they discovered they were twin sisters separated from birth in china it is against the one of the girls was given up for adoption. they share mannerisms and they were married in the same year. the husband has the same first name. >> steve: and they dress alike. >> gretchen: what a fantastic story. the rest of the headlines ttook over 50 years for the murderer of a 7 year old to b brought to justice. jack mccullah will be sentenced for the murder. it is one of the oldest unsolved crimes. he was dismissed as a suspect but arrested last year after the investigation reopened. >> steve: meanwhile a 22 year old woman in oregon jumped in her car and drove off after two kids tried to rob her at gun point. the boys later to be found 7 and 11 years old. demanded money and her phone. >> i was afraid he would shoot my tires or window. i didn't think i was safe. >> brian: the boys were caught and turns out the gun was not loaded it is not known how they got the gun. they were turned over to their familis and the case is expected to go to jv court. >> brian: two students are accused of b
is that coming from because i see china coming back a little, maybe europe's done going down, we seem to be a little bit stalled. somebody's building something around this world. >> i think it's a matter of jabil being very competitive in the markets we serve and having sufficient diversification so that if one part of our business, for instance networking on telecommunications may be going through a lull or slower period with government spending and bess spending, capital spending down, we have some other parts of our business that are doing extremely well. you mentioned some of the mechanics business we're involved in which we call our consumer technology business. that has nothing to do with electronics so we don't have to sell any electronic hardware for those businesses to perform well. parts of our business are a reflection of the economy and other parts of our business are growing very robustly. so i'm very hopeful for the balance of the year and, you know, i think the company is diversified enough to take advantage of whatever opportunities are out there. >> okay. i am so glad
. >> brian: millions of dollars in a green company only to sell it to china? stewart varney with another waste of your money. he's coming up now. ♪ it's my favorite time of year again and now -- i got a great new way to get deals. it's called bankamerideals, from bank of america. i choose the cash back deals in my mobile or online banking. i just use my bank of america debit or credit card when i pay. and i get as much as 15% cash back -- put into my account. this is cash back on top of other rewards i already get. best of all -- it's free. happy holidays. [ male announcer ] introducing bankamerideals, free for online banking customers. sign in to your online banking to choose your deals today. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? ♪ >> gretchen: if you are just waking up it is 17 minutes past the top of the is it like a fire sale on america interest? china buying up u.s. compani
. ultimately it helped to work. a lot of people supported that. people say, apple, they do business in china. these workers are virtually slaves. i will never own the stock. if that is the case they missed out on an investment unless they bought two weeks ago, an investment of a lifetime. so where do you find the way to draw the line? i've got to tell you something, this thing is urban outfitters is more reflective of society, not a company of really the have garrity in society today amongst young people is at the point where i talk about this all the time. i think pendulum has swung so far it can't get much further. lori: do you the think the stock surge up 34% year-to-date, urban outfitters because of shocking nature of stuff? kids in way to rebel and spicy putting it as nicely as i can? what is going on with the store that is generating interest? >> they are ahead of the curve. real hip store called supreme. they have a location in l.a. and soho. urban bought them. it was a brilliant move. this was underground success. they sell it throughout everywhere. it is a real smart retail play. i
for government efficiency, at least in china, ge's ceo's stunning analysis of the communist economic and political system. record finds for wall street's money laundering bank of record, mexican drug cartels, middle east terrorists, african dictators all among hsbc's clientele, and no one is going to jail? why not? legal experts join us here next >> british banking giant, hsbc agreed to pay a record dollars 1.9 billion to settle allegations it landerred money from mexican drug lords, and sanctions transactions from iran illegally. lenny brewer said that the scale of hsbc's operation was stunning. >> at least one occasion, hsbc instructed a bank in iran on how to format payment messages so that transactions would not be blocked or rejected by the united states. lou: brewer however also defended the decision to not prosecute the bank, he said. if authorities pressed charges hsbc would almost certainly have lost its banks license here in this country which would have cost thousands of jobs, joining us now to assess this, and more, former prosecutor alease wheel, and artie idala . is --
about apple losing its cool in the u.s. it looks like that's true in china. the iphone 5 at a very chilly reception for its beijing launch overtight. so, nicole, i think that apple is down again. >> it is, again, down over this, 3% right now. you're talking the 514 range. aen what happened to the $700 range and that's ubs this morning, they kept their buy rating, but reduced their target from 700 to 780 talking about china being one of the issues and not being able to build there. stuart: and the iphone 5 in beijing, there was a snowstorm, okay, a mild snowstorm, there were only two people in line to get those first iphone 5's in china. that's it. only two people. i think that's got something to do with the apple decline this morning. >> you know what, if you really want something, wild horses and snowstorms won't keep you away. stuart: so, i think we can conclude that maybe apple's losing a little of its shine, a little of its cool. maybe, i don't want to be too pejorative here, just maybe. nicole, thank you, down 10 in the early going. i want to take a look at rim, research in mo
a satellite into orbit. its neighbors are unnerved. even china expressed regret at the move. the obama administration condemned it as a provocative act and will likely ask the u.n. security council to impose crippling sanctions. the pentagon following developments this morning. chris lawrence there. what do you know, chris? >> right now, officials say that object that north korea put into orbit, monitoring it, analyzing it, but they confirm it is in orbit. why is that important? the same technology you would use to put into orbit is the same technology you use to develop long-range ballistic missiles, the u.s. condemned this act. they are worried about the marriage of north korea's nuclear weapons with this long-range missile technology. this is the type of missile that if it was successful, as it appears to be, could reach parts of the united states, alaska, u.s. military bases in hawaii. but a u.s. efficiently i spoke with who used to work on north north korea for the defense department told me, there are still areas in which north korea has not made it as far as they would need to i
of santa's route. he follows every new year's. he just was in russia. now he's over the great wall of china. previous to that, he made his way to australia. you can see him flying past the famed opera house there. so he's delivered all of his presents in australia. all of the presents in russia. all the presents in japan, and also south korea, and, of course, now he's busy in china, on his way, of course, over here to the united states. we'll keep you posted. >>> wreaths across america. it's a program that's become part of the healing process for military families around the holidays. today's giving in focus takes a look at a tree farm in maine that helps turn greece into finding peace. >> i know when chris died, we kept thinking about how we were going to remember him. and we kept thinking that his spirit was moving through the trees every time you saw them moving. i seem to be drawn to maine even though i've never lived here. it's pretty amazing. >> we're in the wreath business and have been since 1971. columbia falls is a little town in coastal washington county. the perfect little count
has a healthy respect for government efficiency, at least in china, ge's ceo's stunning analysis of the communist economic and political system. record finds for wall street's money laundering bank of record, mexican drug cartels, middle east terrorists, african dictators all among hsbc's clientele, and no one is going to jail? why not? legal experts join us here next. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which inclus investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-sizprice. this is awesome. [ male annncer ] yes, it is, business pro. yes, it is. go
in places like china? >> yeah, well, take this robotic device i just-- this is a medical device and under the obamacare law, medical devices will be subject to a tax because they have to pay for obamacare. >> paul: yes. >> this is the sort of thing, if we keep doing will suppress the growth of technology in this country and then again, there's the issue of immigration policies. a lot of this technology driven by engineers who come from asia, silicon valley and has been the result of immigration into the united states. if we don't stand in the front of these things, we can grow. >> paul: dan, thank you. coming up in our second half hour, a look ahead to 2013. is the economy poised for a comeback or high unemployment continues to drag us down. get ready for obamacare, what to know as key provisions kick in. ♪ constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. >> live from america's news headquarters, i'm heather
like china? >> well, take the robotic device . this is a medical device. under the obama care law medical devices will be subject to attacks because they have to pay for obama care. this is the sort of thing that if we keep doing will suppress the growth of technology in this country, and then there is the issue of immigration policy. a lot of this technology drefn drefn -- t driven by engineers and silicon valley has been the result of immigration in the united states. if we don't stand in front of these things we can grow. >> thank you. >>> coming up in our second half hour a look ahead to 2013.k is the economy poised for a come back, or will slow growth and high unemployment continue to drag us down? and get ready for obama care. what you need to know as some key provisions kick in. >>> it was terrifying moments at a phoenix bank. workers arrived to find one of their co-workers with a device around her neck, but the device was harmless. she was taken hostage the night before and held against her will overnight. police say the man who did it took her to the bank this morning and
. if you look at the facts, 32% of our manufacturing base has been gutted and sold to china, india, any foreign country that has cheap labor. the top patriotic american companies are parking their profits and offshore accounts so they do not have to pay a fair share of their taxes. the bottom line is since the late '70s, the wealthiest 2% in this country are making 25 times their wealth that they made a black -- back then. there are only paying 40% more in taxes. this country is doomed if we do not start putting terrace of the imports coming into this country. the republican party is selling you an outright lie. thank you. host: let's show you a facebook posting. the economist and professor at the university of maryland will be with us and about 25 minutes or so. he will take your calls and give you his economic outlook for 2013. he has written a lot on the matter. from west virginia, independent. caller: is, sir. i would just like to say that i am not very optimistic above the future of the united states right now. we are in so much that it is pathetic. our budget is way over. this pre
it over the last 8 years is to take out a credit card from the bank of china in the name of our children, driving up our national debt from $5 trillion from the first 42 presidents, number 43 ed a $4 trillion by his lonesome so we now have over $9 trillion of debt that we're going to have to pay back. $30,000 for every man, woman and child. that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> so, unpatriotic. >> the hypocrite in chief says in 2008 that 5 from is unpatriotic but now we're up to $16.4 trillion. that's okay. by the way we move my credit card limits. he doesn't want a debt ceiling going forward. >> debt ceiling no more can congress deal when the president says we're going to raise the debt ceiling. no squabbles back and forth. >> let me get this straight. borrow $4.8 billion a day and now we're coming to the edge ever the fiscal cliff. republicans are saying hey, let's continue the bush tax cuts, let's make this fair for everyone but let's stop spending. we are spending more than we have. democrats are saying now they are saying it doesn't matter, we are not focused on the deficit any
but also offer a great opportunity. you see, what i find in africa today is that china has an increasing presence on that continent. china has a plan when it comes to the future of africa. america does not. that's why i'm going to offer as an amendment to the tag bill, which is currently pending before the senate, the american jobs through greater exports to africa act. my partners on the bill are senator chris coons, senator ben cardin, john boozman and mary landrieu, as well as support in the house from representative chris smith. at the heart of this bill is the creation of jobs in america. exporting more goods to africa will help create jobs here. every $1 billion in exports supports over 5,000 jobs. i believe we can increase exports from the united states to africa by 200% in real dollars over the next ten years, and we can't wait any longer. if there are some who say africa is so backward and so far behind, what is it in the united states they can afford to buy if they even wanted to, that is old thinking. let me give you some new reality. in the past ten years six of the world's f
to help china, and china is the biggest abortion country in the world. when you throw all this into a big mixture, you cannot blame the gun. host: thank you for the call and comment. a bitter fight had on gun control, according to the washington post. we are following some of the options on what is next. speaker boehner is confronting a political cliff over the budget track is, putting out that the speaker's leadership and legacy remained at stake. they point out that in a show of support, house leader eric cantor. at a news conference with the speaker in a call to extend the tax rates. some have urged congressman tom price of georgia to challenge john deere for the job. much more on what is next for the fiscal cliff. one week before we reach that point. the deadline is december 31, january 1. the president is in hawaii. the house and senate are also in set -- in session this week. elliot engel, weighing in on a number of topics, including rumors that former republican senator chuck a bill could be nominated as defense secretary. you heard from the president on friday as he nominated sena
. as far as china is concerned, we don't tariff, we don't put that high of a tariff on their imports but yet i don't know the exact numbers but i believe it's a lot higher that they tax our imports in their country. and the whole thing with jobs. he created the apple scommuret in california in his garage but yet when he got successful he moves all his company over to china, giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he wouldn't even have a garage therefore he wouldn't be able to create the apple computer. so i just think we just don't do enough for the people of this country. and the people who are in position to create jobs and do this do not reinvest in the country. therefore i don't think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giants tax breaks then give it to those who want to invest in the country, who want to create jobs here, not overcease, and they think try to think of ways to get their money over there into here lower than say the american businessman paying 35%. guest: i mean, i understand your frustration. i think part of it is th
] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to squawk. happy monday. today in the "wall street journal" suggesting netflix could end up doomed with its success with children. netflix just for kids get more popular. companies like viacom get accurate. companies provide netflix with most of its content in a kids' focused section. the journal says at some point the suppliers will probably want to charge netflix more or they might even stop selling to netflix. that's been a huge problem for them when it comes to contend more broadly. >> time for the global markets report. kelly evans standing by in london. you rise above over
by using cheaper labor in china. china's also got middle managers to run the factories. chinese workers have been trained in skilled positions for decades. those same skilled positions have nearly vanished here in the united states. and chinese labor is the reason apple can afford to train americans and pay american wages right now. look at this apple's net income. $41.7 billion over the last 4 quarters. that ain't bad. in fact, that's almost $7 billion more than the next six companies combined. microsoft, ebay, google, yahoo! facebook, and amazon. they can't keep up. cheap chinese labor helped apple make almost $50 billion in the next fiscal quarter, alone. those profits allow apple to finally do the right thing. they're going to hire more americans. the ceo says he feels the company has a responsibility to create jobs. we wish more ceos would show that economic patriotism. it's a heck of a start. let's bring in e.j. dionne, msnbc contributor and "washington post" columnist and author of the book "our divided political heart." e.j., we need more stories like this. what kind of skilled
in germany or alabama. want them in lexington, kentucky or china? >> you mentioned germany. volkswagen opened a plant in chattanooga a few months ago, 2,000 new jobs. bob corcoran was down there. 2,000 jobs, every one of which started at $14.50 an hour. >> right. they're not all going to be at -- >> so volkswagen was moving these jobs here because we're the low wage country compared to germany. >> dude, are you suggesting we push these jobs away? >> i'm not. >> i would rather americans have a shot at a $17 an hour job than having it in china. >> i agree. >> find a way to do better. i actually agree with you. but you have to understand the consequences are pretty severe for american lifestyles. >> again, though, i'm sorry, mike, but the consequences are, we have two choices, we can't get 1965 wages, we either have these jobs in china or lexington, either have them in alabama or germany and this is at least for some of -- a chance for younger americans to get some good jobs. >> joe, if you're taking a job that pays $14.50 an hour. it means one of two things, a, you don't have a job so you're ge
your report opens up. a tragic tale of a legal immigrant to this country from china, she was brutally attacked by an illegal immigrant from china, and after chen served his prison term, china refused to take him back. what happened? >> immigration officials in texas let him out more than once, and no point did they ever warn ms. wu this is a wider issue in the immigrant question. that's secrecy. they don't tell the public very much unlike the criminal system who they arrest, who they detain, and what happens to them in the case of ms. wu, she thought the man who brutally attacked her was in china and one day, three years later, he walks through her door and shortly after that kills her. >> why is this happening? why do we have no dodknowledge it? >> the immigration system says they are a civil immigration agency, they detain people they treat like criminals whether they have a record or not and they said that they believe that this is a private matter, that they need to protect the immigrants's privacy. so when we request the name of criminals, they said that the public interest in th
sectors? >> first of all before we ring the death bell on manufacturing, u.s. is above china. we are seeing a resurgence of factory jobs, guess where. >> gregg: southeast. >> why. >> gregg: right to work states. >> businesses don't want to move to places where unions are. in those southeast states, union membership tends to be half what it is on the national achblg which is only 12% right now. even though we see that unemployment is lower in right to work states, but wages are lower, as well. that is kind the tradeoff but businesses want to go there. we are seeing companies from china coming in into the u.s.. >> gregg: i bmw, hyundai, honda and you got american companies, g.e., boeing, apple, michelin, they like that southeastern region because that is where the unions aren't. final quick question, if congress fails to strike a deal it will get a whole lot worse? >> the cbo which is supposed to be non-partisan we're going into a double-dip recession. a lost taxes. you look at your paycheck, the first one in january you are going to see a lot less money. >> gregg: it's not just th
't matter to the stock. tim cook is smart. most of their employees are contract workers are in china. there is only 40,000 here. he was quoted saying we've got to do something about jobs in the united states. i think that is somewhat political move. the big story going forward as i see it, competition really picked up when competition picks up, usually margins get squeezed a little bit. when march twins are squeezed, profits are affected. when profits are affected stocks react negatively. i think you're seeing that right now. i think the stock is forecasting it. gerri: tablet market is amazing. we looked at five different products yesterday. everybody has got one. ipad does not have the market cornered anymore. gary, always a pleasure to have you on the show. thanks for coming on tonight. >> always my pleasure, thank you. gerri: yes, it is fiscal cliff season and it is christmas season but also oscar season when some of the most critically a claimed of years are released and moviegoers flock to see the best of the best. there are some films that few actually go to even though they st
tried to take advantage of it. >> to follow up, i had the advantage of traveling to china with my parents when i was a freshman in college. chairman maou was the chairman of china then. that is how long ago it was. and i got to meet him. my dad used to tell the story of, you know, we were walking through the receiving line, and you did not know when you are going to meet the chairman. it was one of those things that, all of the sudden there would come up to you is that we need to get in the car right now. they did not tell you where you're going. dr. kissinger was with us. dr. kissinger would say, ok, we're obviously going to the palace and we're going to meet the chairman at the time. the picture i have is his eyes light up, he was known to like women.thi this picture i have is it is this man has risen from the dead. he was glad to see this tall, blond woman in china. >> did you have secret service code names? >> yes, mine was panda. it was all "p's." one brother was professor. i can remember what the others were. >> we were "l's." -- we were "v's." i was venus -- i am teasing, i
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courtesy we could possibly be accorded because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another "brothers." they acted that way in private. they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice-chairman and vice-chairman and chairman of the appropriations committee. they single-handedly shaped our american defense posture and they did it with skill and pay troivmen--and patriotism and the that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old school. not a bad school for today, in my point of view. he treated each senator with
it is as far from that as i am from china right now. host: the president yesterday spoke about the debt ceiling and is tied to the fiscal cliff negotiations. [video clip] >> i have to tell you that is a bad strategy for america, a bad strategy for our businesses, and it is not a game that i will play. most of you were involved in discussions and watched the catastrophe that happened in august of 2011. everybody here is concerned about uncertainty. there is no uncertainty like the prospect that the largest economy that holds the world's reserve currency potentially defaults on its debts, that we give out the basic notion that the united states stands behind its obligations. we cannot afford -- host: whil"the wall street journal." guest: the president does not want to negotiate with the republicans on the debt ceiling. that is like giving a son or daughter a credit card to do with it as they want freely. i think the president has to admit that both sides have tried to break measures and legislations to the table that would reduce the debt ceiling. the president -- look at how the deficit has quad
, the biggest companies without a doubt in the world moving jobs out of china. bringing them back to america. apple c eo tim cook with this announcement. >> so we've been working for years on doing more and more in the united states. next year, one of the existing mac lines in the united states. >> existing mac lines. dan simons, you cover things technology here. apple's been under pressure to move production back here, back to the u.s. why now? >> reporter: well, you know, they've been under pressure to do this for sometime. something to do with the human rights an i buss in the plants and here's an opportunity to give back, you know, something to the american economy. the way you look at things is, you know, the company is going to be spending $100 million in terms of bringing back jobs to the u.s. some may say $100 million, you know, is not a lot of money considering that apple has more than $100 billion in the bank. but i think this is a positive sign in terms of how many workers we're talking about here -- >> how many jobs? >> reporter: we don't know precisely or the skills necessary. i
was union and we were making $16 an hour. it went overseas. the company would prefer to go to china and a somebody $2 a day or whatever. these right-to-work states are full of temporary jobs agencies with contracts. the stamp services -- these temporary services are making money and paying people a fraction. we need to let politicians go to a temporary service and give them half of what they are making and make them see how we feel. people working for small amounts of money at temp services. ynette.ow to panetta, conwalive caller: they call it a right-to- work states, but i guess the language got changed, because it used to be a free will state. the employers without unions had the right to fire you for anything, any reason or no reason at all, and you had no recourse. so i still believe in unions and i still believe the people should have a right to join or not. host: this tweet -- are you with us? caller: i am. host: higher wages of less jobs in the state's. caller: yes, but most of the jobs in this area, in the myrtle beach area, those are minimum- wage jobs, where i live. if we
. they would just use other weapons, like they have in china, where they go in the classrooms and used swords and knives and start killing people? . that would probably be a bad idea too. so i think it's just education and trying to curb things that might influence people from doing such. host: what are some suggestions for that, jason? caller: it's hard to say, because a variety of people get into a variety of situations. whatever it is causes them to do things like that. better time spent talking to your kids, more money spent on mental health, things of that nature, i would say. otherwise, you are just point to end up with these situations occurring again. host: here's a story from cnn's talking about this recent attack where a man wielding a knife entered a school. injured 22 children and adults was also wounded. some of those kids are in critical condition. no deaths. does that make a difference to you? caller: certainly. i really don't know what you can do in a situation like that. if you look at gun-control laws such as in phoenix, arizona, where they have certain laws, it has not gone
/11 and in syria and china with the 22 children who were disfigured and cut within less than a week. and then in syria, the 47 people that have been killed by snipers and the thousands that have been killed that our children and women. you can see them on youtube right now. i want to understand why you diminished someones comment with the purpose. rather than being critical, the reality is a horrible situation that happened. i do not defend anything that happened at the school, but the individual data has a $100 shotgun or less -- and individual with a $100 shotgun or less, the situation would have been worse. in 1994 when you lost the assault weapons ban, you also lost the house for tenure. i will stop -- for 10 years. i will invite the listeners to look at the china situation a week ago where years and figures were cut off. guest: as you know, we do live in a society where we do feel protected and represented in government i think that is something that is diminished and there is a sense of government for us. and but we do have a representative democracy and it is something that w
to pay toward china and the middle east will not let him. there was a successful sabotaging program against iran's nuclear program and a ery new approach of iran's central bank and other institutions that continues to enrich uranium. is kind of're seeing the twilight of america's cold war imperium in the middle east. the u.s. will have a relationship with the new egypt but it will not be the relationship of a client state that we saw with's the minority -- hosni mubarak or on war said sadat. is the changing relationship in the country like pakistan after the osama bin laden raid and in states like yemen. they look over the horizon that bahrain and say, we do not want that. host: one of the papers this morning has a story taking a look at the change in leadership in specific countries in asia and highlighting what is going on in north korea, south korea, and japan. what does that prove for the administration? guest: you can put north korea in the same category as japan and south korea. they have taken power and have produced leaders but are still checked by the open society and by th
and terrifying video out of shanghai, china. 33-ton shark tank exploded sending sharks flying everywhere and shoppers running for their lives. at least four people were in front of the tank when it cracked as you saw there. 16 people suffered cuts and bruises, nobody was seriously hurt. three lemon sharks died. officials are investigating whether cold temperatures along with shoddy design may have caused this. >> i'm not sure this gives you the story you want. i got bit by a shark in front of the gap. >> shanghai known for its rigorous building standards. >> i love shanghai but this is always the criticism. is everything built right because it looks good. >> fabulous city but a little shoddy in some of the standards. >> that's a weird story. >> i've never heard of that happening. >> never before. we cover a lot of crazy stories. >>> one of the crazy stories we cover on cnn is the fiscal cliff. we'll wait to see if a critical meeting at the white house will prevent us from falling over the fiscal cliff. congressional leaders meet with president obama and vice president biden if hopes of c
making $1 in mexico in factories. later burma and later china. so suddenly they have a narrative saying mooirn autoworkers make more money than people in mexico and china. those workers have no rights. ordinary citizens in those countries have no rights to change their traditions and now we have ap narrative saying american autoworkers make too mitch but they don't. and point two was to undo labor law. regan came in 1981 and regan, as we famously know. >> let me stop you there on that nearive. undoing the labor lay starts much earlier. >> absolutely. >> i'm just trying to -- >> i know, but the 47 is when it really starts. to say what happens in '47. in some ways '47 -- the opening thing in this batting is really '47. >> i'll start at 35. no one understands how this works. >> hear that america. none of you understand this. >> gun safety and restoring american workers from a middle class standard it's all on a continuum. 1935, the national relation's act is passed. the mlra. by 1947, the taft hartley act is passed and that begins a systematic rollback of labor law in this country but it t
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